Save Danes Moss

Biodiversity update June 2022: highlighting initial compilation of legally protected Section 41 species
Latticed Heath Moth

It has been a busy couple of months for us getting organised on the biological recording. We now have a first update on what is living on the area at risk of development.  Now we have moved from spring into full summer wildlife across the moss is thriving and we expect there will be many more exciting wildlife finds to share. There is never a ‘full’ list as there will always be new and interesting species to see as many are specific to months or even weeks of the year when they can be found. Remember anyone can join in for free, see more here on how to get started and join in with the Danes Moss Bioblitz.

We have processed archive records primarily from inaturalist at Danes moss and the ebird Danes Moss hotspot. It has provided a great start as we already have already been able to upload around 5000 wildlife observations of well over 300 species covering the whole moss including the proposed development area that is at risk of being destroyed. Obviously we are interested in saving all the wildlife that lives there but sadly there are many species in serious decline across the UK, so we are highlighting these to shout about what a valuable and important part of the natural heritage within Cheshire East this site is.

Public bodies including local authorities now have a legal duty to have regard to conserving biodiversity in the exercise of their normal functions. There is currently a list of 943 species which are listed as ‘Section 41 species of principal importance’. Read more about them and see the full list on this Wikipedia page.

This is what we have found so far…

Danes Moss Section 41 species within the proposed development area:

Butterflies

  • Dingy skipper (Erynnis tages)
  • Small heath (Coenonympha pamphilus)

Moths

  • Blood vein (Timandra comae)
  • Buff ermine (Spilosoma luteum)
  • Cinnabar (Tyria jacobaeae)
  • Dusky brocade (Apamea remissa)
  • Grass rivulet (Perizoma albulata)
  • Knot grass (Acronicta rumicis)
  • Latticed heath (Chiasmia clathrata)
  • Shoulder-striped wainscot (Mythimna comma)
  • Small square-spot (Diarsia rubi)
  • White ermine (Spilosoma lubricipeda)

Birds

  • Common bullfinch (Pyrrhula pyrrhula)
  • Common grasshopper warbler (Locustella naevia)
  • Common starling (Sturnus vulgaris)
  • Dunnock (Prunella modularis)
  • Herring gull (Larus argentatus)
  • House sparrow (Passer domesticus)
  • Northern lapwing (Vanellus vanellus)
  • Reed bunting (Emberiza schoeniclus)
  • Song thrush (Turdus philomelos)
  • Willow tit (Poecile montanus)

Amphibians

  • Common toad (Bufo bufo)
Danes Moss Section 41 species outside the development area

Butterflies

  • Dingy skipper (Erynnis tages)
  • Small heath (Coenonympha pamphilus)

Moths

  • Buff ermine (Spilosoma luteum)
  • Cinnabar (Tyria jacobaeae)
  • Latticed heath (Chiasmia clathrata)

Birds

  • Common bullfinch (Pyrrhula pyrrhula)
  • Common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus)
  • Common grasshopper warbler (Locustella naevia)
  • Common linnet (Carduelis cannabina)
  • Common starling (Sturnus vulgaris)
  • Eurasian curlew (Numenius arquata)
  • Eurasian tree sparrow (Passer montanus)
  • Dunnock (Prunella modularis)
  • Herring gull (Larus argentatus)
  • House sparrow (Passer domesticus)
  • Lesser redpoll (Carduelis cabaret)
  • Northern lapwing (Vanellus vanellus)
  • Reed bunting (Emberiza schoeniclus)
  • Skylark (Alauda arvensis)
  • Song thrush (Turdus philomelos)
  • Spotted flycatcher (Muscicapa striata)
  • Willow tit (Poecile montanus)
  • Yellow wagtail (Motacilla flava)

Amphibians

  • Common toad (Bufo bufo)

Reptiles

  • Common lizard (Zootoca vivipara)

Mammals

  • Brown Hare (Lepus europaeus)

As well as the section 41 species, there are 55 species of bird recorded across the whole of Danes Moss that are on the UK Redlist, these are birds listed as of conservation concern:

  • 21 are red status
  • 34 are amber status

Of those recorded within the proposed development area:

  • 8 are red status
  • 18 are amber status.

Our birds webpage here give more details.

More can be found on what these statuses mean on the BTO (British Trust for Ornithology) website.

 

The Dingy Skipper butterfly, as well as being section 41 listed, is also on the IUCN listing as vulnerable to extinction within the UK. Sightings of this species have been recorded on the boundary of the proposed development area as well as within it. More details on our blog page here.

Reed Canary Grass

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